Asian immigrants

Dating out is intercultural: Experience and perceived parent disapproval by ethnicity and immigrant generation

Report Author: 
Sharon Shenhav, Belinda Campos and Wendy A. Goldberg
Original Date of Publication: 
2016 Apr

While differences of opinion regarding dating often leads to conflict between parents and children, romantic relationships between individuals from different cultural groups (intercultural relationships) may be particularly fraught. Older generations are typically less approving of intercultural relationships than younger individuals. These intergenerational conflicts may be exacerbated in immigrant families, as intergroup relationships may be viewed as a threat to maintaining cultural traditions and ethnic identity.

Source Organization: 
Other

Loss of face, intergenerational family conflict, and depression among Asian American and European American college students

Report Author: 
Loss of face, intergenerational family conflict, and depression among Asian American and European American college students Zornitsa Kalibatseva, Frederick T.L. Leong, Eun Hye Ham, Brittany K. Lannert, Yang Chen Psychology
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

Intergenerational conflict and loss of face, or the damage to one's social image, status, and reputation, are significantly correlated to the development of depressive symptoms among Asian-American students. Asian cultures often use shame as a sanction for breaking societal expectations that might result in loss of face. The fear of shame may discourage Asian-American immigrants from seeking help for socially unaccepted issues (e.g. mental health).

Source Organization: 
Other

Filipino Immigrants in the United States (Updated from 2010)

Report Author: 
Jie Zong & Jeanne Batalova
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Mar

Numbering more than 1.9 million, Filipinos are the fourth largest foreign-born group in the U.S. Utilizing data from the US Census Bureau's 2016 American Community Survey and other federal data sources, the Migration Policy Institute provides this update to its profile of Filipino Immigrants in the United States. The profile examines the geographic distribution of Filipinos by state and key cities, demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, categories of admission to the U.S., and remittance data.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

The U.S. Undocumented Population Fell Sharply During the Obama Era: Estimates for 2016

Report Author: 
Robert Warren
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Feb

The undocumented immigrant population in the United States fell by nearly 1 million persons between the years 2010 and 2016 -- from 11.7 million to 10.8 million. The number of undocumented is at its lowest level since 2003.The largest undocumented group, persons from Mexico, has declined sharply. Undocumented Mexicans numbered 6.6 million in 2010 but fell to 5.7 million in 2016. Populations from South America (Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru) and Europe (Poland) also fell between 2010 and 2016.

Source Organization: 
Other

Differential patterns of healthcare service use among Chinese and Korean immigrant elders.

Report Author: 
Kang, S.Y., Kim, I., & Kim, W.
Original Date of Publication: 
2016 Dec

Limited research has analyzed healthcare utilization of Asian immigrant elders who live in geographic areas without supportive ethnic communities. To address this gap in literature, Kang, Kim, and Kim examined the predisposing, enabling and need factor correlates affecting healthcare service use of Chinese and Korean elders in Arizona. For both subgroups, familial support of the elder is an important factor in increasing elders' healthcare utilization, whereas intergenerational differences may impact elders' healthcare usage.

Source Organization: 
Other

Can the Government Deport Immigrants Using Information it Encouraged Them to Provide?

Report Author: 
Amanda Frost
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Sep

This essay describes the legal and policy issues raised by any systematic effort to deport unauthorized immigrants based on information the government invited them to provide. Part I of the essay briefly surveys some of the major laws, regulations, and programs that encourage unauthorized immigrants to identify themselves. Part II assesses the statutory and constitutional arguments that immigrants could raise as a defense against deportations based on self-reported data.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

U.S. Resettles Fewer Refugees, Even as Global Number of Displaced People Grows

Report Author: 
Phillip Connor
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Oct

This report presents a detailed demographic analysis of the incoming U.S. refugee population from FY 2002 to FY 2017 and includes the following data points:  nationality, religious affiliation, gender, age, and state of resettlement.

Source Organization: 
Other

Dreams deferred: Contextualizing the health and psychosocial needs of undocumented Asian and Pacific Islander young adults in Northern California

Report Author: 
Sudhinarase, M., Ling, I., To, T. M., Melo, J., & Quach, T.
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

While Latinos comprise the largest population of undocumented immigrants in the country, Asian and Pacific Islanders (API) are the fastest growing immigrant population in the U.S. and account for 1.5 million of the total 11.2 undocumented immigrants. The literature show that API immigrants, in general, are less likely to seek for mental health services. Moreover, there is little information on the psychosocial needs of undocumented APIs. Thus, this study uses the social capital theory to examine the psychosocial needs and health status of undocumented API young adults.

Source Organization: 
Other

The impact of immigration and customs enforcement on immigrant health: Perceptions of immigrants in Everett, Massachusetts, USA

Report Author: 
Hacker, K., Chu, J., Leung, C., Marra, R., Pirie, A., Brahimi, M., Marlin, R. P.
Original Date of Publication: 
2011 Aug

A series of focus groups were conducted in Everett, MA - a community with a sizeable foreign-born population - and were offered in Spanish, Portuguese, Haitian Creole, Arabic, and English for immigrants of other backgrounds. Documented (37%) and undocumented (63%) participants across all the focus groups described living with a constant fear of deportation, either for themselves or their loved ones.

Source Organization: 
Other

Addressing health disparities in the mental health of refugee children and adolescents through community-based participatory research: A study in 2 communities

Report Author: 
Bentancourt, T.S., Frounfelker, R., Mishra, T., Hussein, A., & Falzarano, R.
Original Date of Publication: 
2015 Jul

Refugee youth have a much higher risk of experiencing psychological distress and mental health disorders than their non-refugee U.S. peers. Much of this elevated risk is due to "multiple acute and chronic stressors" that youth face throughout their refugee experience. To explore the mental health needs and community strengths of Somali Bantu and Bhutanese refugee youth in Massachusetts, this study utilized a community-based participatory research approach - a method that ensures the communities being studied are meaningfully involved at all research stages.

Source Organization: 
Other
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