Children

To walk a mile in someone else's shoes: How narratives can change causal attribution through story exploration and character customization

Report Author: 
Nathan Walter, Sheila T. Murphy & Traci K Gillig
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

Fictional narratives are often an effective way to deliver "prosocial messages," and storytelling has been utilized to increase empathy and understanding toward people who belong to stigmatized groups. One way in which changed attitudes can be measured is by examining the causal attributions that a reader makes. Causal attributions refer to the reader's judgments about whether internal or external characteristics are to blame for a character's negative outcomes or actions.

Source Organization: 
Other

(Un)documented immigrant media makers and the search for connection online

Report Author: 
Sarah C. Bishop
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

Social media serves as an important space for some undocumented youth to create and share their own narratives with a general audience through art, photography, film, writing, and other forms of digital media. Online platforms fill a gap for many undocumented youth, who are often excluded from higher education and the academic world. Social media and other online platforms are a space where undocumented youth can counter mainstream anti-immigrant narratives and stereotypes. As such, digital connection can help reduce isolation and can function as a "communal coping" mechanism.

Source Organization: 
Other

The Changing Family Structure of American Children with Unauthorized Parents

Report Author: 
Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Esther Arenas-Arroyo
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Nov

During the period from 2009 to 2013, the U.S. carried out 1.8 million deportations, most of them involving fathers and heads of households. This paper examines the impact of these deportations on U.S.-born children, specifically the likelihood that they are now living in single-parent households or with friends or other family members. The authors cite literature showing that the absence of a parent increases school drop-out rates, raises teen pregnancy rates, and limits future earnings.

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Source Organization: 
Other

Parental perspectives on parent-child conflict and acculturation in Iranian immigrants in California

Report Author: 
Elmira Jannati and Stuart Allen
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Feb

Acculturation--defined as "moving toward a (new) culture"--is a process that can impact many aspects of life for immigrants and their families. Older and younger immigrant generations may not engage to the same extent with the host culture in their new country. These acculturation gaps are often evident when examining relationships between immigrant parents and their children.

Source Organization: 
Other

Language of the Classroom: Dual Language Learners in Head Start, Public Pre-K, and Private Preschool Programs

Report Author: 
Megina Baker & Mariela Páez
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Mar

This report is one in a series of three reports produced by MPI examining the implications of "superdiverse" communities for early childhood education and care programs and systems. As of 2013, more than one in three children in the U.S. spoke a language other than English at home.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Rethinking English Learner Data: Illinois' Plans Under the Every Student Succeeds Act

Report Author: 
Janie Tankard Carnock
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

This report provides an analysis of Illinois' innovative approach to producing and analyzing data on English language learners (ELLs). The federal Office of Education approved Illinois' plan under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), including its approach to managing data, in August of 2017. Unlike other states, which combine current and former ELLs into one group, Illinois will keep the two groups separate and distinct and collect data on "former ELs" through grade 12.

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Source Organization: 
Other

New Opportunities? ESSA and Its Implications for Dual Language Learners and ECEC Workforce Development

Report Author: 
Delia Pompa, Maki Park and Michael Fix
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

The passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act in 2015, the successor legislation to the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, provides new opportunities to integrate early childhood education and care (ECEC) with K-12 education. This has special importance for dual language learners who now represent 32 percent of all children under the age of 5.  This report details all of the mechanisms available under the Act to strengthen ECEC for immigrant children.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Living in an Immigrant Family in America: How Fear and Toxic Stress are affecting Daily Life, Well-Being, & Health

Report Author: 
Samantha Artiga & Petry Ubri
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

According to this report, immigrant families from various backgrounds are living with increased fear and uncertainty due to the current political climate. The election of Donald Trump has led to policies that increase immigration enforcement and restrict the entry of immigrants from selected countries. These policies can potentially impact 23 million non-citizens who live in the United States, as well as 12 million children who are predominantly U.S.-born.

Source Organization: 
Other

When More Means Less: Mapping the Gaps between Expert and Public Understandings of Dual Language Learners

Report Author: 
Marissa Fond, Michelle Smirnova, Marisa Gerstein Pineau, and Julie Sweetland
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

In an effort to develop "powerful strategies to change how people think about and understand language development," a group of three foundations (the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Heising-Simons Foundation, and the McKnight Foundation) commissioned the FrameWorks Institute to identify the key concepts to be communicated to the public, the nature of the resistance to those concepts, and strategies for overcoming that resistance.

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Source Organization: 
Other

Differing DREAMs: Estimating the Unauthorized Populations that Could Benefit under Different Legalization Bills, Migration Policy Institute

Report Author: 
Jeanne Batalova, Ariel G. Ruiz Soto, Sarah Pierce, and Randy Capps
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Oct

In 2017, the Trump administration announced that it would terminate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. The DACA program had granted protection from deportation and work authorization to unauthorized immigrants who arrived in the United States as children, also known as DREAMers. By mid-October 2017, multiple bills were introduced in response to this announcement including the Recognizing America's Children Act (RAC Act), the DREAM Act of 2017, the American Hope Act, the SUCCEED Act, and Border Security and Deferred Action Recipient Relief Act.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute
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