Latin American immigrants

Immigration and the Welfare State: Immigrant and Native Use Rates and Benefit Levels for Means-Tested Welfare and Entitlement Programs

Report Author: 
Alex Nowrasteh & Robert Orr
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 May

Overall, immigrants are less likely to consume welfare benefits and, when they do, they generally consume a lower dollar value of benefits than native-born Americans. This appears contrary to the study conducted by the CIS (Publication 3), but Cato claims its work is more accurate because it examines individuals with immigration status, while CIS measures welfare use by households headed by immigrants (which often contain multiple native-born Americans).

Source Organization: 
Cato Institute

Philanthropic Strategies to Support Refugees and Asylum Seekers

Report Author: 
Suzette Brooks Masters
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jun

Philanthropic Strategies to Support Refugees and Asylum Seekers profiles 10 donors' diverse approaches and strategies to supporting refugees and asylum seekers, and offers key lessons gleaned from their experience. These profiles are designed to provide a roadmap for supporting refugees, asylum seekers, and unaccompanied children seeking protection in the United States and abroad.

Source Organization: 
Other

Incarcerated Immigrants in 2016: Their Numbers, Demographics, and Countries of Origin

Report Author: 
Alex Nowrasteh & Michelangelo Landgrave
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jun

"Incarcerated Immigrants in 2016: Their Numbers, Demographics, and Countries of Origin" uses American Community Survey data from the U.S. Census Bureau to analyze incarcerated immigrants according to their citizenship and legal status for 2016. The data show that all immigrants—legal and illegal—are less likely to be incarcerated than native-born Americans relative to their shares of the population.

Source Organization: 
Cato Institute

Implications of Immigration Enforcement Activities for the Well-Being of Children in Immigrant Families: A Review of the Literature

Report Author: 
Randy Capps, et al.
Original Date of Publication: 
2015 Sep

Implications of Immigration Enforcement Activities for the Well-Being of Children in Immigrant Families: A Review of the Literature examines the evidence concerning the impacts of deportation and fear of deportation on unauthorized immigrant families and children. The economic and social instability that generally accompanies unauthorized status is further aggravated for children with a parent's deportation, with effects including psychological trauma, material hardship, residential instability, family dissolution, increased use of public benefits and, among boys, aggression.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Deportation by Any Means Necessary: How Immigration Officials Are Labeling Immigrant Youth as Gang Members

Report Author: 
Laila L. Hlass & Rachel Prandini
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Feb

Deportation by Any Means Necessary: How Immigration Officials Are Labeling Immigrant Youth as Gang Members details findings from a national survey of legal practitioners concerning the increased use of gang allegations against young immigrants as a means of driving up deportation numbers, at the encouragement of the Trump administration. The report suggests emerging best practices for immigration attorneys to employ in both fighting against unfounded gang allegations and working to mitigate the impact of prior gang involvement.

Source Organization: 
The Immigrant Legal Resource Center

Do Family Separation and Detention Deter Immigration?

Report Author: 
Tom K. Wong
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jul

In response to broad public backlash over his administration’s policy of separating children from their parents at the United States’ southwest border, President Donald Trump signed an executive order in June 2018 that purports to replace family separation with potentially indefinite family detention. Numerous Trump administration officials have supported such policies under the belief that they would deter families from attempting to enter the United States.

Source Organization: 
Center for American Progress

Temporary Protected Status and Immigration to the United States

Report Author: 
David A. Leblang, et al.
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jun

Although immigration reform has proved elusive for more than forty years, presidents from both parties have issued crucial executive actions that regulate inflows of new immigrants and the status of those already in the US. "Temporary Protected Status and Immigration to the United States" focuses on a particular class of executive actions, those related to granting immigrants Temporary Protected Status (TPS), exploiting the fact that immigrants who hold TPS receive access to the formal US labor market regardless of their legal status.

Source Organization: 
Other

Immigration Governance for the Twenty-First Century

Report Author: 
Ruth Ellen Wasem
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

Arguing that "immigration is not a program to be administered" but rather "a phenomenon to be managed," Ruth Ellen Wasem, former immigration specialist for the Congressional Research Service and now a Professor of Public Policy at the University of Texas, reviews the "checkered past" of immigration policy over the last century and, despite numerous efforts to reform the system, the "fragmented" and "diffuse" nature of immigration governance today. "Today the US system of immigration governance," she writes, "is scattered across the federal government, with no clear chain of command..."

Source Organization: 
Center for Migration Studies

National Guard Heads to Southern Border Amid Differing Reality from Earlier Deployments

Report Author: 
Muzaffar Chishti, Sarah Pierce, & Austin Rose
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Apr

"National Guard Heads to Southern Border Amid Differing Reality from Earlier Deployments" discusses the rationale for the deployment of 4,000 National Guard troops to the U.S.-Mexico border by the Trump administration. Unlike previous deployments by the Obama and George W. Bush administrations, no apparent crisis precipitated the president's decision; nor did the states in question (Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California) request the deployment, as they had done earlier.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

A Two-Way Street: How Immigration Shapes Everyday Life in Silicon Valley

Report Author: 
Tomás R. Jiménez
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Apr

"A Two-Way Street: How Immigration Shapes Everyday Life in Silicon Valley" is based on the author's research for his recently published book entitled, "The Other Side of Assimilation:  How Immigrants are Changing American Life," in which he explores the concept of "relational assimilation," described as a process of mutual accommodation whereby both immigrants and "established individuals" change as they adapt to one another over time. He defines "established individuals" as U.S. born people with parents also born in the U.S.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

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