Latin American immigrants

Growing Superdiversity among Young U.S. Dual Language Learners and Its Implications

Report Author: 
Maki Park, Jie Zong, & Jeanne Batalova
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Feb

The United States is quickly becoming a more diverse nation, thanks in part to the increasing number of children born with at least one parent who speaks a language other than English. Growing Superdiversity among Young U.S. Dual Language Learners and Its Implications finds that these children, often referred to as Dual Language Learners (or DLLs), now account for almost one-third of all children in the United States between the ages of 0 and 8. Using data from the U.S.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Collaboration in Support of New Americans

Report Author: 
Jen Vanek, Heide Wrigley, Erik Jacobson, & Janet Isserlis
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Apr

The Open Door Collective (ODC) is a network of concerned professionals dedicated to reshaping U.S. society to reduce levels of poverty and economic inequality. ODC members believe that adult education and lifelong learning are important tools in this quest, especially because adults with low literacy, numeracy, and English language skills, are much more likely to live in poverty.

Source Organization: 
Other

Twenty Years after IIRIRA: The Rise of Immigrant Detention and its Effects on Latinx Communities Across the Nation

Report Author: 
Melina Juárez, Bárbara Gómez-Aguiñaga & Sonia P. Bettez
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

"Twenty Years after IIRIRA: The Rise of Immigrant Detention and its Effects on Latinx Communities Across the Nation" argues that corporate interests, specifically CoreCivic and the GEO group - two companies that operate nine out of the 10 largest immigrant detention centers in the U.S.

Source Organization: 
Center for Migration Studies

Freezing Out Justice: How Immigration Arrests at Courthouses are Undermining the Justice System

Report Author: 
American Civil Liberties Union
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

Since the beginning of the Trump administration, immigration authorities have significantly increased their enforcement activities at courthouses - by 1,200 percent in New York in 2017 alone.

Source Organization: 
Other

Immigration Detention, Inc.

Report Author: 
Denise Gilman & Luis A. Romero
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

Some 350,000 immigrants are detained each year by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and about 30,000 immigrants are in detention on any day. Private prison corporations increasingly manage and profit from rising immigrant detention. Managing immigrant detention is a money-making business for corporations like the GEO Group, which opened a family detention facility in 2014 and soon after had $30 million in increased quarterly profits. The CoreCivic prison company had $245 million in revenue in one year from family detention.

Source Organization: 
Center for Migration Studies

Revving Up the Deportation Machinery: Enforcement under Trump and the Pushback

Report Author: 
Randy Capps, Muzaffar Chishti, Julia Gelatt, Jessica Bolter, & Ariel G. Ruiz Soto
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 May

Revving Up the Deportation Machinery: Enforcement under Trump and the Pushback results from a year-long study into how immigration enforcement has been handled by the Trump administration. The enforcement environment, the report finds, has changed in two different ways. The administration has become much more aggressive in seeking to remove any unauthorized immigrant - regardless of whether a crime has been committed. However, the report finds that arrests and deportations are about at half the level during their peak (2008-2011).

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Operation Streamline: No Evidence that Criminal Prosecution Deters Migration

Report Author: 
Michael Corradini, Jonathan Allen Kringen, Laura Simich, Karen Berberich, & Meredith Emigh
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jun

Before the so-called "zero-tolerance" policy implemented by the Trump Administration in April of 2018 that mandated criminal prosecution for all immigrants entering the country without authorization, there was a similar policy known as "Operation Streamline," which began in 2005 and continued through 2014.

Source Organization: 
Other

The H-4 Visa Classification: Attracting and Maintaining Global Talent

Report Author: 
American Immigration Council
Original Date of Publication: 
2016 Mar

"The H-4 Visa Classification: Attracting and Maintaining Global Talent" provides an overview of the H-4 Visa and a profile of current recipients. It explains the eligibility of certain H-4 spouses to work and the benefits of allowing them to do so. The H-4 visa category is for the spouses and unmarried children under 21 of other H temporary nonimmigrant workers, including H-1B specialty workers. In 2017, there were more than 136,000 H-4 visas issued-86 percent to family members of workers from India. Beginning in 2015, H-4 spouses of certain H-1B workers were given the right to work.

Source Organization: 
American Immigration Council

Instilling Fear and Regulating Behavior: Immigration Law as Social Control

Report Author: 
Lori A. Nessel
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Mar

In "Instilling Fear and Regulating Behavior: Immigration Law as Social Control," Lori Nessel, Professor of Law at Seton Hall University School of Law, argues the plenary power doctrine, which shields immigration law from constitutional scrutiny, coupled with the Trump Administration's targeting of all undocumented immigrants for deportation, have created a climate of fear in the workplace, which creates a "largely compliant workforce," unable and unwilling to assert their rights.

Source Organization: 
Other

Immigrant Lives, American Futures: Linking Asset Building and Immigrant Integration

Report Author: 
Manuel Pastor, Rhonda Ortiz, & Magaly N. López
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 May

Immigrant Lives, American Futures: Linking Asset Building and Immigrant Integration seeks to create common cause and greater alignment among funders interested in immigrant integration and those interested in asset-building. Often, the horizon for action is different for both, i.e. more short-term and crisis oriented for integration funders, and more long-term and life cycle focused among asset-building funders. To bridge this difference will require a change in perspective on the part of both types of funders.

Source Organization: 
Other

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