Latin American immigrants

Alterations for an Outdated Immigration System: Immigration Reform is Crucial for Maintaining Talent and Innovation in the U.S. Fashion Industry

Report Author: 
FWD.us & the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA)
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

In addition to employing more than 1.9 million workers nation-wide, the U.S. fashion industry bolsters the profits of numerous ancillary industries, such as photography, graphic design, publishing, set design, public relations, and hospitality. The industry has long been dependent on the infusion of talent and manpower from immigrants.

Source Organization: 
Other

Does Migration Increase Happiness? It Depends

Report Author: 
Martijn Hendriks
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jun

"Does Migration Increase Happiness? It Depends" reviews available evidence from the social science literature on the effects of migration on the happiness of both migrants and native-born residents in immigrant-receiving countries, with special attention to the 2018 World Happiness Report published by the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network. Researchers determine Happiness levels in two ways: affectively using mood questions, and cognitively using questions to determine overall satisfaction with life.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Chilling Effects: The Expected Public Charge Rule and Its Impact on Legal Immigrant Families’ Public Benefits Use

Report Author: 
Jeanne Batalova, Michael Fix, & Mark Greenberg
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jun

The Trump Administration is currently writing a regulation that will completely change the way the government determines whether an immigrant (or an immigrant's sponsor) is "likely to become a public charge" by greatly expanding the list of public benefits, the use of which will make immigrants inadmissible (and possibly deportable).

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Regulatory Rights: Civil Rights Agencies, Courts, and the Entrenchment of Language Rights

Report Author: 
Ming Hsu Chen
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

The "rights revolution" in the United States consisted of both sweeping changes in constitutional doctrines and landmark legislative reform, followed by decades of innovative implementation in every branch of the federal government -- Congress, agencies, and the courts.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

Stereotyped Identification: How Identifying with Fictional Latina Characters Increases Acceptance and Stereotyping

Report Author: 
Bryan McLaughlin, Nathian S. Rodriguez, Joshua A. Dunn & Jobi Martinez
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Apr

Film and media are powerful tools of influence. Although the messages can positively influence greater acceptance of certain groups, they can also intentionally or unintentionally create and uphold stereotypes of immigrants. "Stereotyped Identification: How Identifying with Fictional Latina Characters Increases Acceptance and Stereotyping," a study by Mclaughlin, Rodriguez, Dunn, & Martinez (2018), demonstrates how television portrayals of Latina women allow viewers to cognitively and emotionally identify with the characters.

Source Organization: 
Other

Dominican Immigrants in the United States

Report Author: 
Jie Zong & Jeanne Batalova
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Apr

This "Spotlight" report details the major demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of Dominican immigrants in the U.S. based on census and Department of Homeland Security data. Among data points covered in the report are: educational attainment, labor force participation, income and poverty levels, immigration pathways and naturalization rates, health coverage, and remittance levels.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Dating out is intercultural: Experience and perceived parent disapproval by ethnicity and immigrant generation

Report Author: 
Sharon Shenhav, Belinda Campos and Wendy A. Goldberg
Original Date of Publication: 
2016 Apr

While differences of opinion regarding dating often leads to conflict between parents and children, romantic relationships between individuals from different cultural groups (intercultural relationships) may be particularly fraught. Older generations are typically less approving of intercultural relationships than younger individuals. These intergenerational conflicts may be exacerbated in immigrant families, as intergroup relationships may be viewed as a threat to maintaining cultural traditions and ethnic identity.

Source Organization: 
Other

Socioeconomic Integration of U.S. Immigrant Groups over the Long Term: The Second Generation and Beyond

Report Author: 
Brian Duncan & Stephen J. Trejo
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Mar

Large-scale immigration raises questions about the social and economic progress of new arrivals, their U.S.-born children and the third generation. Some observers suggest that the sheer size and geographic concentration of recent immigration could hinder immigrants' social and economic integration. The authors of this paper examine some of the available data on this question, as well as methodological problems associated with the data. The Current Population Survey (CPS) has nativity questions about the respondent and her/his parents that may be used to assess generational change.

Source Organization: 
Other

Connecting the Dots: Emerging Migration Trends and Policy Questions in North and Central America

Report Author: 
Claudia Masferrer, Víctor M. García-Guerrero, and Silvia E. Giorguli-Saucedo
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Mar

The authors of this paper take a sweeping look at the entire North American "migration corridor," consisting of Canada, the United States, Mexico, and the "Northern Triangle" countries of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras. They note that patterns of migration are much more complex and multi-directional than they were in the past, when south-north migration was the dominant pattern. For example, approximately 1 million U.S.-born persons moved to Mexico during the 2010-2015 period, made up largely of retirees and children of persons deported from the U.S.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Hispanic Identity Fades Across Generations as Immigrant Connections Fall Away

Report Author: 
Mark Hugo Lopez, et al
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

While there are 42.7 million adults in the United States with Hispanic ancestry, 11 percent do not identify as Hispanic. This number is expected to increase due to a long-standing high intermarriage rate and a decade of decreasing immigration from Latin America. In the report Hispanic Identity Fades Across Generations as Immigrant Connections Fall, the authors examine the experiences and self-identity of U.S. adults with Hispanic heritage.

Source Organization: 
Other

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