Latin American immigrants

The U.S. Undocumented Population Fell Sharply During the Obama Era: Estimates for 2016

Report Author: 
Robert Warren
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Feb

The undocumented immigrant population in the United States fell by nearly 1 million persons between the years 2010 and 2016 -- from 11.7 million to 10.8 million. The number of undocumented is at its lowest level since 2003. The largest undocumented group, persons from Mexico, has declined sharply. Undocumented Mexicans numbered 6.6 million in 2010 but fell to 5.7 million in 2016. Populations from South America (Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru) and Europe (Poland) also fell between 2010 and 2016.

Source Organization: 
Other

Effective strategies for Affordable Care Act enrollment in immigrant-serving safety net clinics in New Mexico

Report Author: 
Getrich, C., García, J., Solares, A., & Kano, M.
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has been widely viewed as a mechanism for reducing health disparities through expanding insurance coverage and thus healthcare access. However, the ACA distinguishes between lawfully present and unauthorized immigrants, with the latter being excluded from the ACA's insurance enrollment options. This study interviewed healthcare providers at safety net clinics (including community health centers) in New Mexico, one of the country's poorest states whose population is also 47.7% Hispanic (many of whom are immigrants).

Source Organization: 
Other

The healthcare needs of Latinos with serious mental illness and the potential of peer navigators

Report Author: 
Corrigan, P., Torres, W., Lara, A., Sheehan, J., & Larson, L
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

The healthcare needs of Latinxs with severe mental illness, barriers to accessing care, potential solutions to those barriers and the possibility that peer navigators might be able to fill the gap were addressed by this study. Through a community-based participatory research (CBPR) model in which Latinxs with a lived experience of severe mental illness were involved at all stages of the process, focus groups and interviews were conducted with members of several Latinx communities in Chicago.

Source Organization: 
Other

Immigration policies and mental health morbidity among Latinos: A state-level analysis

Report Author: 
Hatzenbuehler, M.L., Prins, S.J., Flake, M., Philbin, M., Frazer, M.S., Hagen, D., & Hirsch, J.
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Feb

Social workers understand the importance of analyzing their client in the context of their environment. Macro structures (e.g. policy) have a direct impact on the mental health disparities and vulnerabilities of Latino populations. According to research by Hatzenbuehler et al. (2017), Latinos living in environments with exclusionary immigration policies and climates have significantly higher rates of poor mental health days than Latinos in less exclusionary environments.

Source Organization: 
Other

A Statistical and Demographic Profile of the US Temporary Protected Status Populations from El Salvador, Honduras, and Haiti

Report Author: 
Robert Warren and Donald Kerwin
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

About 90 percent of Temporary Protected Status recipients are from El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti. At the time that “A Statistical and Demographic Profile of the US Temporary Protected Status Populations from El Salvador, Honduras, and Haiti” was published, TPS for these three countries were up for renewal (but have been since been terminated.) This paper examines the demographics of TPS beneficiaries from El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti and evaluates what would happen to the U.S. and TPS holders if TPS designations ended.

Source Organization: 
Other

Economic Contributions by Salvadoran, Honduran, and Haitian TPS Holders: The Cost to Taxpayers, GDP, and Businesses of Ending TPS

Report Author: 
Amanda Baran and Jose Magaña-Salgado with Tom K. Wong
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Apr

Due to extraordingary, temporary, natural disasters in El Salvador, Honduras, and Haiti, the United States Congress granted Temporary Protected Status to individuals from those countries currently in the U.S. because returning to their home country would be unsafe. TPS grants individuals work authorization and protection from deportation until the Secretary determines that those immigrants' home countries can safely handle the return of their nationals.

Source Organization: 
Other

Extending Temporary Protected Status for Honduras: Country Conditions and U.S. Legal Requirements

Report Author: 
Jayesh Rathod et al
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Nov

Following Hurricane Mitch in 1998, which displaced thousands of people and severely damaged physical infrastructure and socio-economic stability in Honduras and Nicaragua, the U.S. Congress granted Temporary Protected Status (TPS) to Hondurans and Nicaraguans in the U.S. TPS provides relief to foreign nationals who are unable to return to their home countries due to natural disaster, economic instability or violence. This report details the current conditions in Honduras.

Source Organization: 
Other

Can the Government Deport Immigrants Using Information it Encouraged Them to Provide?

Report Author: 
Amanda Frost
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Sep

This essay describes the legal and policy issues raised by any systematic effort to deport unauthorized immigrants based on information the government invited them to provide. Part I of the essay briefly surveys some of the major laws, regulations, and programs that encourage unauthorized immigrants to identify themselves. Part II assesses the statutory and constitutional arguments that immigrants could raise as a defense against deportations based on self-reported data.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

Differing DREAMs: Estimating the Unauthorized Populations that Could Benefit under Different Legalization Bills

Report Author: 
Jeanne Batalova, Ariel G. Ruiz Soto, Sarah Pierce, and Randy Capps
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Oct

In 2017, the Trump administration announced that it would terminate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. The DACA program had granted protection from deportation and work authorization to unauthorized immigrants who arrived in the United States as children, also known as DREAMers. By mid-October 2017, multiple bills were introduced in response to this announcement including the Recognizing America's Children Act (RAC Act), the DREAM Act of 2017, the American Hope Act, the SUCCEED Act, and Border Security and Deferred Action Recipient Relief Act.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

U.S. Resettles Fewer Refugees, Even as Global Number of Displaced People Grows

Report Author: 
Phillip Connor
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Oct

This report presents a detailed demographic analysis of the incoming U.S. refugee population from FY 2002 to FY 2017 and includes the following data points:  nationality, religious affiliation, gender, age, and state of resettlement.

Source Organization: 
Other

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