Workers

Welcome to Work? Legal Migration Pathways for Low-Skilled Workers

Report Author: 
Kathleen Newland & Andrea Riester
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

This brief explores the international migration opportunities available to low-skilled workers, the constraints on their movement and the development impacts of these patterns. Permanent admissions programs for low-skilled labor are rare. However, a number of trends in Western industrialized countries have combined to create high demand for low-skilled workers to fill temporary and longer-term jobs. Some of this demand may be met indirectly, through family reunification or humanitarian admissions, but currently most programs for the admission of low-skilled workers are temporary programs.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Delivering through Diversity

Report Author: 
Vivian Hunt et al
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

Companies with diverse members in leadership positions are more than 20 percent likely to outperform on profitability and have superior value creation. Delivering through Diversity from McKinsey & Company discusses the relationship between diversity and business success and describes the inclusion and diversity (I&D) initiatives that seem to accelerate business performance.

Source Organization: 
Other

Refugees, Rights, and Responsibilities: Bridging the Integration Gap

Report Author: 
Megan J. Ballard
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Sep

The author of this paper makes two important arguments: first, that the U.S. refugee resettlement program has operated under an early employment goal that "undermines" the goal of successful integration; and second, that private sector actors can help to overcome this deficiency, in part through a workshop program piloted in Spokane, WashingtonThe author considers refugee integration to be a multi-dimensional process involving 10 different domains (a theoretical model borrowed from two British scholars: Aliastair Ager and Alison Strang).

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

Career Pathways in Nursing: Using Your Foreign Education in the United States,

Report Author: 
World Education Services
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

Designed for foreign-trained nurses interested in reestablishing their careers in a new country, this guide provides practical advice on how to traverse the career landscape in the United States. After reviewing the requirements for licensure as a nurse in the United States, including procedures for credential evaluation and options for supplemental education, the guide also suggests the possibility of alternate careers in healthcare, either as a stepping-stone into nursing later on or as a permanent career choice.

Source Organization: 
Other

Do Human Capital Decisions Respond to the Returns to Education? Evidence from DACA

Report Author: 
Elira Kuka et al
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Feb

This paper suggests that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program had a significant impact on young undocumented immigrants' decision-making. The paper highlights increases in high school attendance and high school graduation rates, increased pursuit of postsecondary education, and greater workforce participation by those pursuing education, as well as decreased teen fertility rates. The study draws on data from the Census Bureau's American Community Survey, the Youth Risk Behavior Factor Surveillance Survey, and a California Department of Education dataset.

Source Organization: 
Other

Health care service utilization of documented and undocumented hired farmworkers in the U.S.

Report Author: 
Luo, T., & Escalante, C.L.
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Nov

Access to healthcare is a major concern for documented and undocumented immigrant farmworkers.  According to Luo and Escalante (2017), immigrants constitute over half of the U.S. agriculture sector, but are significantly less likely to seek health care services than other farmworkers. Furthermore, the authors' research revealed that undocumented farmworkers are 10.7% less likely to seek health care services than migrant workers with a legal immigration status.

Source Organization: 
Other

DREAM Act-Eligible Poised to Build on the Investments Made in Them

Report Author: 
Donald Kerwin and Robert Warren
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

Political debate has intensified over "Dreamers" -- immigrants who were brought to the United States as children without authorization. In this paper, Donald Kerwin and Robert Warren from the Center for Migration Studies argue that granting Dreamers a path to citizenship would capitalize on the educational investments already made in them and boost their already high economic productivity.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

How Might Restricting Immigration Affect Social Security's Finances

Report Author: 
Damir Cosic and Richard W. Johnson
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

Most economists agree that immigration boosts productivity, raises the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and prevents labor shortages. In 2016, one in six workers in the United States was an immigrant. These immigrant workers finance a major share of Old Age, Survivors and Disability Insurance (OASDI) payroll taxes that fund Social Security.

Source Organization: 
The Urban Institute

Expanding the Dream: Engaging Immigrant Youth and Adults in Post-Secondary and Adult Education

Report Author: 
Duy Pham and Wendy Cervantes
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Nov

The authors of this brief argue that while the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program (DACA) has had a positive impact both on the lives of the undocumented immigrants who signed up for it and on the country as a whole, it is not enough, and an updated DREAM act should be passed that provides a lasting reform of the nation's immigration laws.

Source Organization: 
Other

Ready to work: Understanding Immigrant Skills in the United States to Build a Competitive Workforce

Report Author: 
Rob Paral
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Aug

In order to maximize the potential of foreign-born workers in the U.S., policy makers and practitioners in the workforce development field must first understand the diverse characteristics, assets and needs of immigrants. This report provides a detailed portrait of the foreign-born working population in the U.S., emphasizing sociodemographic characteristics, immigration status, geographic distribution, and levels of education and training.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other
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