Economics

America's Demographic Challenge: Understanding the Role of Immigration

Report Author: 
Kenneth Megan & Theresa Cardinal Brown
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Aug

With numerous charts and graphs, this paper outlines the projected growth of various age segments of the U.S. population, showing that the native-born, working-age population will grow much more slowly than the foreign-born working-age population. The relative growth of the 65-and-over population will present economic challenges. In particular, the Social Security trust fund is projected to be depleted by 2034, assuming that current levels of immigration remain relatively constant.

Source Organization: 
Other

Immigrant Founders of the 2017 Fortune 500

Report Author: 
Center for American Entrepreneurship
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

Since 1955, Fortune Magazine has annually ranked the top 500 publically listed and private companies in the U.S. by revenue. In 2011, 40 percent of the "Fortune 500" companies had at least one founder who was a first generation immigrant or child of an immigrant. By 2017, according to this study from the Center for American Entrepreneurship, the number of firms founded or co-founded by first or second generation immigrants had increased to 43 percent.

Source Organization: 
Other

Understanding America's Legal Immigration System

Report Author: 
Stuart Anderson
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

This paper very briefly describes the U.S. immigration system, explains why immigration is important to the country, and addresses many of the myths prevalent in the immigration debate of today. In the context of current proposals to cut legal immigration, the author explains the importance of immigration for the growth in our workforce. He also notes that immigrants are disproportionately entrepreneurs, and immigrants who've come on family visas start many of America's small businesses. Immigrants have also made many important contributions in the fields of science and medicine.

Source Organization: 
Other

A Profile of Current DACA Recipients by Education, Industry, and Occupation

Report Author: 
Jie Zong, Ariel G. Ruiz Soto, Jeanne Batalova, Julia Gelatt, and Randy Capps
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Nov

In September 2017, the Trump administration announced it would discontinue the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which granted temporary legal protection against deportation for unauthorized immigrants who were brought to the United States as children. Using recent data from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), MPI researchers have prepared this educational and occupational profile of individuals currently holding DACA status. Among the key findings is that DACA recipients are almost as likely as U.S.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

A Statistical and Demographic Profile of the US Temporary Protected Status Populations from El Salvador, Honduras, and Haiti

Report Author: 
Robert Warren and Donald Kerwin
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

About 90 percent of Temporary Protected Status recipients are from El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti. At the time that “A Statistical and Demographic Profile of the US Temporary Protected Status Populations from El Salvador, Honduras, and Haiti” was published, TPS for these three countries were up for renewal (but have been since been terminated.) This paper examines the demographics of TPS beneficiaries from El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti and evaluates what would happen to the U.S. and TPS holders if TPS designations ended.

Source Organization: 
Other

Economic Contributions by Salvadoran, Honduran, and Haitian TPS Holders: The Cost to Taxpayers, GDP, and Businesses of Ending TPS

Report Author: 
Amanda Baran and Jose Magaña-Salgado with Tom K. Wong
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Apr

Due to extraordingary, temporary, natural disasters in El Salvador, Honduras, and Haiti, the United States Congress granted Temporary Protected Status to individuals from those countries currently in the U.S. because returning to their home country would be unsafe. TPS grants individuals work authorization and protection from deportation until the Secretary determines that those immigrants' home countries can safely handle the return of their nationals.

Source Organization: 
Other

New Americans and a New Direction: The Role of Immigrants in Reviving the Great Lakes Region

Report Author: 
New American Economy and the Great Lakes Metro Chambers Coalition
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Oct

New Americans and a New Direction: The Role of Immigrants in Reviving the Great Lakes Region examines population and demographic trends in the Great Lakes region and argues that immigrants are playing a key role in boosting the region's lagging population growth, especially among the working-age and college-educated populations. The report looks closely at the region's manufacturing, health care, and agricultural sectors.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

Extending Temporary Protected Status for Honduras: Country Conditions and U.S. Legal Requirements

Report Author: 
Jayesh Rathod et al
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Nov

Following Hurricane Mitch in 1998, which displaced thousands of people and severely damaged physical infrastructure and socio-economic stability in Honduras and Nicaragua, the U.S. Congress granted Temporary Protected Status (TPS) to Hondurans and Nicaraguans in the U.S. TPS provides relief to foreign nationals who are unable to return to their home countries due to natural disaster, economic instability or violence. This report details the current conditions in Honduras.

Source Organization: 
Other

Heartland Hospitality: Serving the Needs of the Midwest Economy through Immigration

Report Author: 
Sara McElmurry
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Aug

This paper looks at five key challenges facing the hospitality industry in the Midwest-an industry that is responsible for 10 percent of all jobs in the region. For a variety of reasons, the industry is facing a significant challenge in filling jobs. In some cases, businesses are closing for lack of workers. The shortage of workers overall has led to a dependence on immigrant workers, but there is limited availability of immigrant and non-immigrant visas to meet employer needs.

Source Organization: 
Other

Profiles of Boston’s Latinos

Report Author: 
Boston Planning & Development Agency
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

Although the various Latino nationality groups in Boston are often described as a single ethnic group, there is great diversity within the Latino community. Profiles of Boston’s Latinos by the Boston Planning & Development Agency captures this diversity by examining the seven largest Latino groups in Boston: Puerto Rican (28 percent of total Latino population), Dominican (24 percent), Salvadoran (11 percent), Colombian (6 percent), Mexican (5 percent), Brazilian (3 percent), and Guatemalan (3 percent). Using data from the U.S.

Source Organization: 
Other

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