Economics

A Statistical and Demographic Profile of the US Temporary Protected Status Populations from El Salvador, Honduras, and Haiti

Report Author: 
Robert Warren and Donald Kerwin
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

About 90 percent of Temporary Protected Status recipients are from El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti. At the time that “A Statistical and Demographic Profile of the US Temporary Protected Status Populations from El Salvador, Honduras, and Haiti” was published, TPS for these three countries were up for renewal (but have been since been terminated.) This paper examines the demographics of TPS beneficiaries from El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti and evaluates what would happen to the U.S. and TPS holders if TPS designations ended.

Source Organization: 
Other

Economic Contributions by Salvadoran, Honduran, and Haitian TPS Holders: The Cost to Taxpayers, GDP, and Businesses of Ending TPS

Report Author: 
Amanda Baran and Jose Magaña-Salgado with Tom K. Wong
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Apr

Due to extraordingary, temporary, natural disasters in El Salvador, Honduras, and Haiti, the United States Congress granted Temporary Protected Status to individuals from those countries currently in the U.S. because returning to their home country would be unsafe. TPS grants individuals work authorization and protection from deportation until the Secretary determines that those immigrants' home countries can safely handle the return of their nationals.

Source Organization: 
Other

New Americans and a New Direction: The Role of Immigrants in Reviving the Great Lakes Region

Report Author: 
New American Economy and the Great Lakes Metro Chambers Coalition
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Oct

This report examines population and demographic trends in the Great Lakes region and argues that immigrants are playing a key role in boosting the region's lagging population growth, especially among the working-age and college-educated populations. The report looks closely at the region's manufacturing, health care, and agricultural sectors.

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Source Organization: 
Other

Extending Temporary Protected Status for Honduras: Country Conditions and U.S. Legal Requirements

Report Author: 
Jayesh Rathod et al
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Nov

Following Hurricane Mitch in 1998, which displaced thousands of people and severely damaged physical infrastructure and socio-economic stability in Honduras and Nicaragua, the U.S. Congress granted Temporary Protected Status (TPS) to Hondurans and Nicaraguans in the U.S. TPS provides relief to foreign nationals who are unable to return to their home countries due to natural disaster, economic instability or violence. This report details the current conditions in Honduras.

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Other

Heartland Hospitality: Serving the Needs of the Midwest Economy through Immigration

Report Author: 
Sara McElmurry
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Aug

This paper looks at five key challenges facing the hospitality industry in the Midwest-an industry that is responsible for 10 percent of all jobs in the region. For a variety of reasons, the industry is facing a significant challenge in filling jobs. In some cases, businesses are closing for lack of workers. The shortage of workers overall has led to a dependence on immigrant workers, but there is limited availability of immigrant and non-immigrant visas to meet employer needs.

Source Organization: 
Other

Profiles of Boston’s Latinos

Report Author: 
Boston Planning & Development Agency
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

Although the various Latino nationality groups in Boston are often described as a single ethnic group, there is great diversity within the Latino community. Profiles of Boston’s Latinos by the Boston Planning & Development Agency captures this diversity by examining the seven largest Latino groups in Boston: Puerto Rican (28 percent of total Latino population), Dominican (24 percent), Salvadoran (11 percent), Colombian (6 percent), Mexican (5 percent), Brazilian (3 percent), and Guatemalan (3 percent). Using data from the U.S.

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Source Organization: 
Other

The Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration

Report Author: 
National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Editors: Francine D. Blau, Christopher Mackie
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

In an effort to understand the economic and fiscal impacts of immigration on the United States, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine convened a distinguished panel of 22 economists, sociologists, and demographers, chaired by Francine D. Blau, of the Department of Economics at Cornell University. In a study process lasting three years, the panel pored over the existing scholarly literature and secured input from experts around the United States.

Source Organization: 
Other

The Education and Work Profiles of the DACA Population

Report Author: 
Randy Capps, Michael Fix, and Jie Zong
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Aug

The authors of this report applied their unique methodology to Census data to determine the characteristics of what they call the DACA “immediately eligible” population—those who have met all educational requirements for participation in the program. Past studies of this population have been survey-based, but have not been fully representative.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

The Philippines: Beyond Labor Migration, Toward Development and (Possibly) Return

Report Author: 
Maruja M.B. Asis
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

The Philippines has a significant culture of migration and is a major labor exporter worldwide. Ten million Filipinos, around 10 percent of the population, are working abroad, primarily in the Middle East and Asia. Thanks to an improved economy in recent years, the Philippines is now developing policies for returning overseas Filipino workers (OFWs). This study examines the evolving labor policies of the last few decades and shows how the country is incorporating migration into its long-term development planning.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

The Immigrant Right to Work

Report Author: 
Geoffrey Heeren
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Sep

The author reviews over 100 years of political and legal history to make the case that unauthorized residents of the United States have a right work.  A key starting point is that there is currently no statute that actually prevents unauthorized immigrants from working (if they do not present false papers). Rather, through employer sanctions and related policies there is a putative illegality that forces undocumented workers into conditions that limit their choice of employment and reduces their labor rights, mainly through fears of deportation.

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Source Organization: 
Other
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