Demographics

A New Estimate of the Cost of Reversing DACA

Report Author: 
Logan Albright, Ike Brannon & M. Kevin McGee
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Feb

Using data on the age and educational outcomes of nearly 3,000 college students who are DACA recipients this study forecasts their income in the ensuing decade to estimate the total economic and fiscal impact over the next decade of allowing this cohort to remain in the country and legally pursue employment.

Download now or view online

Source Organization: 
Cato Institute

Do Immigration Enforcement Programs Reduce Crime? Evidence from the 287(g) Program in North Carolina

Report Author: 
Alex Nowrasteh & Andrew Forrester
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Apr

Do Immigration Enforcement Programs Reduce Crime? Evidence from the 287(g) Program in North Carolina examines 287(g)'s implementation across multiple counties in North Carolina and identifies its impact on local crime rates and police clearance rates by exploiting time variation in regional immigration enforcement trends. The 287(g) program did not affect the crime rate in North Carolina or police clearance rates but it did boost the number of assaults against police officers.

Source Organization: 
Cato Institute

Number of Foreign College Students Staying and Working in U.S. After Graduation Surges

Report Author: 
Neil G. Ruiz & Abby Budiman
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 May

Number of Foreign College Students Staying and Working in U.S. After Graduation Surges presents findings based on ICE's data from the federal government's Optional Practical Training program. Between 2004 and 2016, nearly 1.5 million foreign graduates of U.S. colleges and universities obtained authorization to remain and work in the U.S. through this program. The data shows a 400% increase in foreign students graduating and working in STEM fields from 2008 to 2016.

Source Organization: 
Pew Research Center

Incarcerated Immigrants in 2016: Their Numbers, Demographics, and Countries of Origin

Report Author: 
Alex Nowrasteh & Michelangelo Landgrave
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jun

"Incarcerated Immigrants in 2016: Their Numbers, Demographics, and Countries of Origin" uses American Community Survey data from the U.S. Census Bureau to analyze incarcerated immigrants according to their citizenship and legal status for 2016. The data show that all immigrants—legal and illegal—are less likely to be incarcerated than native-born Americans relative to their shares of the population.

Source Organization: 
Cato Institute

Implications of Immigration Enforcement Activities for the Well-Being of Children in Immigrant Families: A Review of the Literature

Report Author: 
Randy Capps, et al.
Original Date of Publication: 
2015 Sep

Implications of Immigration Enforcement Activities for the Well-Being of Children in Immigrant Families: A Review of the Literature examines the evidence concerning the impacts of deportation and fear of deportation on unauthorized immigrant families and children. The economic and social instability that generally accompanies unauthorized status is further aggravated for children with a parent's deportation, with effects including psychological trauma, material hardship, residential instability, family dissolution, increased use of public benefits and, among boys, aggression.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Do Family Separation and Detention Deter Immigration?

Report Author: 
Tom K. Wong
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jul

In response to broad public backlash over his administration’s policy of separating children from their parents at the United States’ southwest border, President Donald Trump signed an executive order in June 2018 that purports to replace family separation with potentially indefinite family detention. Numerous Trump administration officials have supported such policies under the belief that they would deter families from attempting to enter the United States.

Source Organization: 
Center for American Progress

Temporary Protected Status and Immigration to the United States

Report Author: 
David A. Leblang, et al.
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jun

Although immigration reform has proved elusive for more than forty years, presidents from both parties have issued crucial executive actions that regulate inflows of new immigrants and the status of those already in the US. "Temporary Protected Status and Immigration to the United States" focuses on a particular class of executive actions, those related to granting immigrants Temporary Protected Status (TPS), exploiting the fact that immigrants who hold TPS receive access to the formal US labor market regardless of their legal status.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

A Two-Way Street: How Immigration Shapes Everyday Life in Silicon Valley

Report Author: 
Tomás R. Jiménez
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Apr

"A Two-Way Street: How Immigration Shapes Everyday Life in Silicon Valley" is based on the author's research for his recently published book entitled, "The Other Side of Assimilation:  How Immigrants are Changing American Life," in which he explores the concept of "relational assimilation," described as a process of mutual accommodation whereby both immigrants and "established individuals" change as they adapt to one another over time. He defines "established individuals" as U.S. born people with parents also born in the U.S.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Sub-Saharan African Immigrants in the U.S. Are Often More Educated Than Those in Top European Destinations

Report Author: 
Monica Anderson & Phillip Connor
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Apr

More than a million sub-Saharan Africans have migrated to the United States and Europe since 2010. Sub-Saharan African Immigrants in the U.S. Are Often More Educated Than Those in Top European Destinations by the Pew Research Center analyzed data from the United Nations, the U.S. Census Bureau's 2015 American Community Survey and Eurostat's 2015 Labor Force Survey to offer a current portrait of these migrants.

Source Organization: 
Pew Research Center

Foot Voting, Decentralization, and Development

Report Author: 
Ilya Somin
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Apr

In "Foot Voting, Decentralization, and Development," legal scholar Ilya Somin reconceptualizes migration as a form of voting - a way for people to realize their potential in places more conducive to economic development. Such places may be states or regions within countries, or other countries. "Foot voting," according to the author, even has major advantages over regular ballot box voting.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other
Syndicate content