Civil Rights

Daring to Dream: Sustaining Support for Undocumented Students at The Evergreen State College

Report Author: 
Grace Huerta and Catalina Ocampo
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

The election of President Donald Trump has heightened fears among undocumented immigrants. While Plyler v. Doe protects students at the K-12 level, accessibility and resources for undocumented students wishing to pursue higher education are limited. Student organizers across the country have been demanding higher education institutions to declare their position as sanctuary campuses. Such a designation entails that the university will protect its undocumented immigrants through refusing cooperation with ICE agents and allocating funds to support undocumented students.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

Enforcement, Integration, and the Future of Immigration Federalism

Report Author: 
Cristina Rodriguez
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

In this paper, the author looks at the tension between federal and state and local policies on immigration enforcement and integration.

Source Organization: 
Other

Cuban Migration: A Postrevolution Exodus Ebbs and Flows

Report Author: 
Jorge Duany
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

This article examines the history of Cuban emigration and the political context within which it has occurred. While there was Cuban migration to the U.S. before the Cuban Revolution of 1959, the scale of that migration increased greatly afterwards. The author divides migration since 1959 into five phases and notes that the socioeconomic characteristics of migrants changes with each new phase. The first wave from 1959 and 1962 consisted largely of the upper and middle classes; later, Cuban migrants increasingly resembled labor migrants coming from other countries.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Sanctuary Networks

Report Author: 
Pratheepan Gulasekaram and Rose Cuison Villazor
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Apr

In light of heightened immigration enforcement, the term ‘sanctuary’ has been increasingly popular in the media and amongst immigration rights advocates. This article defines sanctuary as a range of policies adopted by public and private entities which seek to limit participation in federal immigration enforcement practices to engage in deliberate non-cooperation with immigration policy. The article offers a concise overview of the history of the sanctuary movement and explores how concepts of sanctuary have evolved in the context of hyper-enforcement within immigration policy. 

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Source Organization: 
Other

Beyond Economics: Fears of Cultural Displacement Pushed the White Working Class to Trump

Report Author: 
Daniel Cox, Ph.D., Rachel Lienesch, Robert P. Jones, Ph.D
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

The white working class voted for Donald Trump over Hillary Clinton in the 2016 U.S. presidential election by a margin of roughly two to one. To illuminate the characteristics, attitudes and experiences that were most significant in predicting white working-class voters' support for Trump, researchers at the Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI) tested a variety of demographic, cultural and economic factors before and after the election that may have influenced these voters.

Source Organization: 
Other

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in North Carolina: Perspectives from Immigrants and Community-Based Organizations

Report Author: 
Hannah Gill and Sara Peña
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jan

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which provides work authorization and a two-year reprieve for some young, undocumented immigrants, affects both the individual granted the reprieve and the broader economy. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in North Carolina: Perspectives from Immigrants and Community-Based Organizations examines the impact of the program in the state with the highest application rate for the first two years of DACA’s existence.

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Source Organization: 
Other

Mass Deportations Would Impoverish US Families and Create Immense Social Costs

Report Author: 
Robert Warren and Donald Kerwin
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Feb

This paper assesses the impact of large-scale deportations on mixed-status families, i.e. families comprised of both documented and undocumented members. In 2014, there were 6.6 million US-born citizens residing in 3 million households with undocumented residents (usually parents). Of these US-born citizens, 5.7 million are children under the age of 18. Removing undocumented family members would reduce median household income by 47 percent (from $41,300 to $22,000).

Source Organization: 
Other

Non-Citizens Are Not Voting. Here Are the Facts

Report Author: 
Wendy R. Weister & Douglas Keith
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Feb
Source Organization: 
Other

Immigration and Public Safety

Report Author: 
Nazgol Ghandnoosh & Josh Rovner
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Mar
Source Organization: 
Other

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