Human Services

At the Intersection of Immigration and Skills Policy: A Roadmap to Smart Policies for State and Local Leaders

Report Author: 
Amanda Bergson-Shilcock
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Sep

As Welcoming Week (September 14-23) prepares to kick off, with hundreds of events scheduled around the country, National Skills Coalition is releasing a new report that gives state and local advocates fresh ideas for advancing policies to improve immigrant access to workforce and adult education services. 

Source Organization: 
Other

The Resilience of Students with an Immigrant Background: Factors that Shape Well-being

Report Author: 
OECD
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Mar

Migration flows are profoundly changing the composition of classrooms. Results from the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) reveal that in 2015, almost one in four 15-year-old students in OECD countries reported that they were either foreign-born or had at least one foreign-born parent. Between 2003 and 2015, the share of students who had either migrated or who had a parent who had migrated across international borders grew by six percentage points, on average across OECD countries.

Source Organization: 
Other

English Learners in Select States: Demographics, Outcomes, and State Accountability Policies

Report Author: 
Julie Sugarman & Courtney Geary
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Aug

As states shape and implement policies that hold K-12 schools and districts accountable for meeting federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) mandates regarding the education of English Learners (ELs), this series of fact sheets provides an overview of EL student demographics and outcomes in select states. It aims to build understanding among parents, educators, community advocates, and others of the characteristics of ELs in their states, of achievement gaps between ELs and their peers, and of the accountability policies states are designing to monitor their progress.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Detaining Families: A Study of Asylum Adjudication in Family Detention

Report Author: 
Ingrid Eagly, Esq., Steven Shafer, Esq. & Jana Whalley, Esq.
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Aug

The United States currently detains more protection-seeking families than any nation in the world. Since 2001, parents and their children have been held at various times in five different detention facilities in New Mexico, Texas, and Pennsylvania, as they seek asylum in the United States. The number of detention beds reserved exclusively for families has ballooned since the first facility opened in 2001. Between 2001 and 2016, capacity reserved exclusively for detaining families increased by an astronomical 3,400 percent.

Source Organization: 
American Immigration Council

Tearing Down the Second Wall: Ending USCIS’s Backlog of Citizenship Applications and Expanding Access to Naturalization for Immigrants: Third Addendum to Second Wall Report

Report Author: 
Diego Iñiguez-López
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jul

The National Partnership for New Americans (NPNA) released a third addendum to its Building a Second Wall report, which documents the growing backlog of naturalization applications since the start of the Trump presidency. The author suggests this backlog may be a “critical tool in the Trump administration’s attacks on immigrant communities” -- a tool designed to delay or deny citizenship to eligible immigrants.

Source Organization: 
Other

Immigration and the Welfare State: Immigrant and Native Use Rates and Benefit Levels for Means-Tested Welfare and Entitlement Programs

Report Author: 
Alex Nowrasteh & Robert Orr
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 May

Overall, immigrants are less likely to consume welfare benefits and, when they do, they generally consume a lower dollar value of benefits than native-born Americans. This appears contrary to the study conducted by the CIS (Publication 3), but Cato claims its work is more accurate because it examines individuals with immigration status, while CIS measures welfare use by households headed by immigrants (which often contain multiple native-born Americans).

Source Organization: 
Cato Institute

Philanthropic Strategies to Support Refugees and Asylum Seekers

Report Author: 
Suzette Brooks Masters
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jun

Philanthropic Strategies to Support Refugees and Asylum Seekers profiles 10 donors' diverse approaches and strategies to supporting refugees and asylum seekers, and offers key lessons gleaned from their experience. These profiles are designed to provide a roadmap for supporting refugees, asylum seekers, and unaccompanied children seeking protection in the United States and abroad.

Source Organization: 
Other

Immigrant Lives, American Futures: Linking Asset Building and Immigrant Integration

Report Author: 
Manuel Pastor, Rhonda Ortiz, & Magaly N. López
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 May

Immigrant Lives, American Futures: Linking Asset Building and Immigrant Integration seeks to create common cause and greater alignment among funders interested in immigrant integration and those interested in asset-building. Often, the horizon for action is different for both, i.e. more short-term and crisis oriented for integration funders, and more long-term and life cycle focused among asset-building funders. To bridge this difference will require a change in perspective on the part of both types of funders.

Source Organization: 
Other

Chilling Effects: The Expected Public Charge Rule and Its Impact on Legal Immigrant Families’ Public Benefits Use

Report Author: 
Jeanne Batalova, Michael Fix, & Mark Greenberg
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jun

The Trump Administration is currently writing a regulation that will completely change the way the government determines whether an immigrant (or an immigrant's sponsor) is "likely to become a public charge" by greatly expanding the list of public benefits, the use of which will make immigrants inadmissible (and possibly deportable).

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Leveraging Social Science Expertise in Immigration Policymaking

Report Author: 
Ming Hsu Chen
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Apr

Why is social science expertise important in policymaking, and why is such expertise noticeably shunned in immigration policymaking, an area of governance often swirling in a sea of misinformation, prejudice, and political posturing? These are two questions that the author of this paper seeks to answer.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

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