Human Services

Coming of Age on the Margins: Mental Health and Wellbeing Among Latino Immigrant Young Adults Eligible for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

Report Author: 
Rachel Siemons, Marissa Raymond-Flesh, Colette L. Auerswald, Claire D. Brindis
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

Undocumented immigrant Latino young adults face discrimination, marginalization, and are restricted from accessing critical resources such as health insurance through the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Moreover, the fear and stressors associated with the possibility of being deported can affect the mental health and wellbeing (MHWB) of undocumented immigrants. This study aims to assess the effects of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) on the MHWB of 61 Latino young adults using the ecological framework.

Source Organization: 
Other

Racism, the immigration enforcement regime, and the implications for racial inequality in the lives of undocumented young adults

Report Author: 
Aranda, E., & Vaquera, E.
Original Date of Publication: 
2015 Jan

Despite the fact that living without legal documentation in the U.S. is considered a civil offense, undocumented immigrants are often depicted and treated as criminals. As a result, undocumented immigrants are subjected to policing and disciplining, such as detainment and use of ankle monitoring device, that are reserved for people who commit serious criminal offenses. Moreover, during President Barrack Obama's presidency, mass deportation reached an all-time high that only sustained the fears and anxiety of undocumented immigrants.

Source Organization: 
Other

The impact of immigration and customs enforcement on immigrant health: Perceptions of immigrants in Everett, Massachusetts, USA

Report Author: 
Hacker, K., Chu, J., Leung, C., Marra, R., Pirie, A., Brahimi, M., Marlin, R. P.
Original Date of Publication: 
2011 Aug

A series of focus groups were conducted in Everett, MA - a community with a sizeable foreign-born population - and were offered in Spanish, Portuguese, Haitian Creole, Arabic, and English for immigrants of other backgrounds. Documented (37%) and undocumented (63%) participants across all the focus groups described living with a constant fear of deportation, either for themselves or their loved ones.

Source Organization: 
Other

Multi-tier mental health program for refugee youth

Report Author: 
Ellis, B.H., Miller, A.B., Abdi, S., Barrett, C., Blood, E.A., & Betancourt, T.S.
Original Date of Publication: 
2013 Feb

The research literature indicates that a lack of resources has a significant impact on the overall psychosocial well-being of refugee youth, perhaps playing an even larger role in predicting psychological distress than the experience of trauma itself. Taking into account environmental factors, including resource hardships and acculturative stresses, is crucial for any intervention promoting the mental well-being of refugee youth. The authors of this study report preliminary findings from an intervention implemented with Somali refugee middle school students in New England.

Source Organization: 
Other

Addressing health disparities in the mental health of refugee children and adolescents through community-based participatory research: A study in 2 communities

Report Author: 
Bentancourt, T.S., Frounfelker, R., Mishra, T., Hussein, A., & Falzarano, R.
Original Date of Publication: 
2015 Jul

Refugee youth have a much higher risk of experiencing psychological distress and mental health disorders than their non-refugee U.S. peers. Much of this elevated risk is due to "multiple acute and chronic stressors" that youth face throughout their refugee experience. To explore the mental health needs and community strengths of Somali Bantu and Bhutanese refugee youth in Massachusetts, this study utilized a community-based participatory research approach - a method that ensures the communities being studied are meaningfully involved at all research stages.

Source Organization: 
Other

Deportations in the Dark: Lack of Process and Information in the Removal of Mexican Migrants

Report Author: 
Sara Campos & Guillermo Cantor
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Sep

This report is based on the testimonies of 600 migrants who were deported from the United States to Mexico between August 2016 and April 2017. Those interviewed pointed towards systematic failures to follow established procedures for detention and deportation. For example, 43.5 percent of interviewees reported that they were not informed of their right to contact their consulate, and more than half (55.7 percent) were not asked if they feared returning home – a key element of applying for asylum.

Source Organization: 
Other

The Philippines: Beyond Labor Migration, Toward Development and (Possibly) Return

Report Author: 
Maruja M.B. Asis
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

The Philippines has a significant culture of migration and is a major labor exporter worldwide. Ten million Filipinos, around 10 percent of the population, are working abroad, primarily in the Middle East and Asia. Thanks to an improved economy in recent years, the Philippines is now developing policies for returning overseas Filipino workers (OFWs). This study examines the evolving labor policies of the last few decades and shows how the country is incorporating migration into its long-term development planning.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Gender-Based Violence against Women: Both Cause for Migration and Risk along the Journey

Report Author: 
Anja Parish
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Sep

This brief addresses gender-based violence that may cause women to migrate, as well as the prevalence of such violence along the journey and the vulnerable position female migrants are in when arriving in a country of first asylum.  The author notes that increasingly rape and sexual violence have become military strategies, often used within a single country when there are multiple factions fighting for control.  Evidence is presented from all over the world,

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Immigration and the Bully Pulpit

Report Author: 
Jennifer M. Chacón
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

This essay looks at how the Trump administration's approach to immigration, while powered by a "rhetoric of unconstrained severity," has "deep roots" in the policies of the previous two administrations and represents a "doubling-down on some of the least productive approaches to enforcement."  The first part of the essay describes the enforcement landscape of the Obama administration and how that landscape changed over time.

Source Organization: 
Other

The Perils of Expedited Removal: How Fast-Track Deportations Jeopardize Asylum Seekers

Report Author: 
Kathryn Shepherd & Royce Bernstein Murray
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

This paper documents what is happening to women and children crossing the U.S.-Mexico border and seeking asylum in the U.S. For the most part, they are fleeing horrific violence in Central America. Using information drawn from thousands of cases of families detained at the South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley, Texas, this report illustrates the difficulties these asylum seekers are having navigating the fast-track removal process known as expedited removal.

Source Organization: 
Other

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