Workforce/Labor

A Statistical and Demographic Profile of the US Temporary Protected Status Populations from El Salvador, Honduras, and Haiti

Report Author: 
Robert Warren and Donald Kerwin
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

About 90 percent of Temporary Protected Status recipients are from El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti. At the time that “A Statistical and Demographic Profile of the US Temporary Protected Status Populations from El Salvador, Honduras, and Haiti” was published, TPS for these three countries were up for renewal (but have been since been terminated.) This paper examines the demographics of TPS beneficiaries from El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti and evaluates what would happen to the U.S. and TPS holders if TPS designations ended.

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Other

Economic Contributions by Salvadoran, Honduran, and Haitian TPS Holders: The Cost to Taxpayers, GDP, and Businesses of Ending TPS

Report Author: 
Amanda Baran and Jose Magaña-Salgado with Tom K. Wong
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Apr

Due to extraordingary, temporary, natural disasters in El Salvador, Honduras, and Haiti, the United States Congress granted Temporary Protected Status to individuals from those countries currently in the U.S. because returning to their home country would be unsafe. TPS grants individuals work authorization and protection from deportation until the Secretary determines that those immigrants' home countries can safely handle the return of their nationals.

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Other

For Love of Country: New Americans Serving in Our Armed Forces

Report Author: 
Maurice Belanger et al
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Nov

Dating back to the earliest days of the Republic, immigrants have played an integral role in the defense of the United States and its assets around the globe. In the mid-19th century, half of all Army recruits were immigrants, and in 2016, 11 percent of U.S. veterans were first- or second-generation immigrants. During past wars, immigrants were permitted to serve if they declared their intent to become citizens and then were granted citizenship in recognition of their service. However, in 1961 Congress added lawful U.S.

Source Organization: 
Other

New Americans and a New Direction: The Role of Immigrants in Reviving the Great Lakes Region

Report Author: 
New American Economy and the Great Lakes Metro Chambers Coalition
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Oct

This report examines population and demographic trends in the Great Lakes region and argues that immigrants are playing a key role in boosting the region's lagging population growth, especially among the working-age and college-educated populations. The report looks closely at the region's manufacturing, health care, and agricultural sectors.

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Other

Diversifying the Classroom: Examining the Teacher Pipeline

Report Author: 
Constance A. Lindsay et al
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Oct

A look into any urban school classroom reveals how diverse student populations have become. The same, however, cannot be said for the teaching staff. Diversifying the Classroom: Examining the Teacher Pipeline seeks to understand the reasons for America's predominantly white workforce in education. Research shows that students of color perform better with a teacher of the same race or ethnicity; therefore, a diverse teacher workforce is crucial for improving student performance outcomes.

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Other

Heartland Hospitality: Serving the Needs of the Midwest Economy through Immigration

Report Author: 
Sara McElmurry
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Aug

This paper looks at five key challenges facing the hospitality industry in the Midwest-an industry that is responsible for 10 percent of all jobs in the region. For a variety of reasons, the industry is facing a significant challenge in filling jobs. In some cases, businesses are closing for lack of workers. The shortage of workers overall has led to a dependence on immigrant workers, but there is limited availability of immigrant and non-immigrant visas to meet employer needs.

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Other

Profiles of Boston’s Latinos

Report Author: 
Boston Planning & Development Agency
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

Although the various Latino nationality groups in Boston are often described as a single ethnic group, there is great diversity within the Latino community. Profiles of Boston’s Latinos by the Boston Planning & Development Agency captures this diversity by examining the seven largest Latino groups in Boston: Puerto Rican (28 percent of total Latino population), Dominican (24 percent), Salvadoran (11 percent), Colombian (6 percent), Mexican (5 percent), Brazilian (3 percent), and Guatemalan (3 percent). Using data from the U.S.

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Other

The Other America: White working class views on belonging, change, identity and immigration

Report Author: 
Harris Beider, Stacy Harwood, and Kusminder Chahal
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

Throughout the 2016 presidential election cycle, campaign officials and members of the media used the term "white working class" to describe the supporters of Donald Trump. Through this qualitative study conducted during and after the election, the authors examine whether the definition and understanding of the "white working-class" are relevant to people who identify as white and working-class. The researchers conducted hundreds of interviews with community leaders and organized focus groups in five geographically diverse areas of the United States.

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Other

The Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration

Report Author: 
National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Editors: Francine D. Blau, Christopher Mackie
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

In an effort to understand the economic and fiscal impacts of immigration on the United States, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine convened a distinguished panel of 22 economists, sociologists, and demographers, chaired by Francine D. Blau, of the Department of Economics at Cornell University. In a study process lasting three years, the panel pored over the existing scholarly literature and secured input from experts around the United States.

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Other

Comparing trauma exposure, mental health needs, and service utilization across clinical samples of refugee, immigrant, and US-Origin children

Report Author: 
Betancourt, T. S., Newnham, E. A., Birman, D., Lee, R., Ellis, B. H., & Layne, C. M
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

Although the experiences of immigrant children differ from refugee youth, both groups experience stressors associated with acculturation, resettlement, and potential abuse or community violence. Mental health care is underutilized among refugee youth given that most services do not take into account distinct traumatic experiences and histories resulting from war-related violence.

Source Organization: 
Other
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