Research

Bringing Vitality to Main Street: How Immigrant Small Businesses Help Local Economies Grow

Report Author: 
David Dyssegaard Kallick
Original Date of Publication: 
2015 Jan

Immigrants were responsible for all of the net growth in Main Street business nationally and in 31 of the 50 largest U.S. metropolitan areas between 2000 and 2013. This is the main finding of a first-of-its-kind report that demonstrates the high value of immigrants to local economies, particularly as Main Street business owners, and their importance in building healthy, safe and economically viable neighborhoods.

Why Don't They Naturalize? Voices from the Dominican Community

Report Author: 
Alan Hyde, Ray A. Mateo and Bridgit Cusato-Rosa
Original Date of Publication: 
2013 Sep

Why Don't They Naturalize? Voices from the Dominican Community

U.S. High-Skilled Immigration, Innovation and Entrepreneurship: Empirical Approaches and Evidence

Report Author: 
William R. Kerr
Original Date of Publication: 
2013 Aug

In the 2008 Current Population Survey, immigrants represented 16 percent of the United States workforce with a bachelor's education. Moreover, immigrants accounted for 29 percent of the growth in this workforce during the 1995-2008 period. Exceeding these strong overall contributions, the role of immigrants within science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields is even more pronounced. Even so, the importance of the global migration of STEM talent has been under-studied. In this paper, "U.S.

Immigrant Entrepreneurship: The Role of Formal Corporate Governance Arrangement and Social Capital in Community and Family

Report Author: 
Lei Xu and Wei Du
Original Date of Publication: 
2013 Sep

The authors of this paper empirically test the relation between immigrants' venture creation decisions and governance mechanism under a unified framework of governance in both sociology and finance. They find that corporate governance arrangements are more valued by entrepreneurs with better education attainment and higher household income such as immigrant entrepreneurs. This type of entrepreneur tends to be more reluctant to create a venture due to the high opportunity costs.