Students

The Ethnic Composition of U.S. Inventors

Report Author: 
William R. Kerr
Original Date of Publication: 
2008 Dec

The Ethnic Composition of U.S. Inventors (click to view)

The contributions of immigrants to U.S. technology formation are staggering. While the foreign-born account for just over 10 percent of the U.S. working population, they represent 25 percent of the U.S. science and engineering workforce and nearly 50 percent of those with doctorates. 

How Much Does Immigration Boost Innovation?

Report Author: 
Jennifer Hunt, Marjolaine Gauthier-Loiselle
Original Date of Publication: 
2009 Jan

How Much Does Immigration Boost Innovation? (click to view)

The authors measure the extent to which skilled immigrants increase innovation in the United States by exploring individual patenting behavior as well as state-level determinants of patenting.  

Losing the World's Best and Brightest: America's New Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Part V

Report Author: 
Vivek Wadhwa, AnnaLee Saxenian, Richard B. Freeman and Alex Salkever
Original Date of Publication: 
2009 Mar

America's New Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Part V (click to view)

Foreign national students have come to the United States to study and have participated in some of the most advanced academic research efforts to date. They lend enormous brainpower to the development of technological and scientific innovations that benefitted America.  

America's Loss is the World's Gain: America's New Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Part IV

Report Author: 
Vivek Wadhwa, AnnaLee Saxenian, Richard B. Freeman and Gary Gereffi
Original Date of Publication: 
2009 Mar

 

America's New Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Part IV (click to view)

Immigrants have historically provided one of America's greatest competitive advantages. A large and growing proportion of immigrants come with high levels of education and skill. Immigrants have co-founded firms such as Google, Intel, eBay and Yahoo.

Education, Entrepreneurship and Immigration: America's New Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Part II

Report Author: 
Vivek Wadhwa, Ben Rissing, AnnaLee Saxenian and Gary Gereffi
Original Date of Publication: 
2007 Jun

 

America's New Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Part II (click to view)

Intellectual Property, the Immigration Backlog and a Reverse Brain-Drain: America's New Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Part III

Report Author: 
Vivek Wadhwa, Guillermina Jasso, Ben Rissing, Gary Gereffi and Richard B. Freeman
Original Date of Publication: 
2007 Aug

America's New Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Part III (click to view)

America's New Immigrant Entrepreneurs: Part I

Report Author: 
Vivek Wadhwa, AnnaLee Saxenian, Ben Rissing and Gary Gereffi
Original Date of Publication: 
2007 Jan

This research assesses the contribution of skilled immigrants in the creation of engineering and technology businesses and intellectual property in the United States. The authors found there was at least one immigrant key founder in 25.3 percent of all engineering and technology companies established in the U.S. between 1995 and 2005 inclusive. The authors estimate that, together, this pool of immigrant-founded companies was responsible for generating more than $52 billion in 2005 sales and creating just under 450,000 jobs as of 2005.

Uneven Progress: The Employment Pathways of Skilled Immigrants in the United States

Report Author: 
Jeanne Batalova and Michael Fix with Peter A. Creticos
Original Date of Publication: 
2008 Oct

More than 1.3 million college-educated immigrants in the United States are unemployed or working in unskilled jobs because they are unable to make full use of their academic and professional credentials, MPI reports in the first assessment yet of the scope of the "brain waste" problem.

This report analyzes and offers possible solutions for the credentialing and language-barrier hurdles that deprive the US economy of a rich source of human capital at a time of increasing competition globally for skilled talent. 

Harnessing the Advantages of Immigration for a 21st-Century Economy

Report Author: 
Demetrios G. Papademetriou, Doris Meissner, Marc R. Rosenblum and Madeleine Sumption
Original Date of Publication: 
2009 May

The U.S. immigration system neither meets labor market needs efficiently nor minds the interests of U.S. workers with particular success. It has yet to devise a way that uses immigration to promote U.S. economic growth and competitiveness well.  

Syndicate content