Latin American immigrants

Daring to Dream: Sustaining Support for Undocumented Students at The Evergreen State College

Report Author: 
Grace Huerta and Catalina Ocampo
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

The election of President Donald Trump has heightened fears among undocumented immigrants. While Plyler v. Doe protects students at the K-12 level, accessibility and resources for undocumented students wishing to pursue higher education are limited. Student organizers across the country have been demanding higher education institutions to declare their position as sanctuary campuses. Such a designation entails that the university will protect its undocumented immigrants through refusing cooperation with ICE agents and allocating funds to support undocumented students.

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Source Organization: 
Other

The Role of Faculty, Counselors, and Support Programs on Latino/a Community College Students’ Success and Intent to Persist

Report Author: 
Esau Tovar
Original Date of Publication: 
2014 Oct

Community colleges serve as the primary point of entry into higher education for more than 50% of all Latinx college students, including those studying to earn certificates or associate's degrees as well as those hoping to transfer to four-year institutions. This study utilized a sample of Latinx community college students in California (75% of whom were first-generation students). The results demonstrated that participation in student support programs had a small but significant impact on both a student's academic success as well as their intent to pursue degree completion.

Source Organization: 
American Federation of Teachers

How are Refugees Faring: Integration at U.S. and State Levels

Report Author: 
Michael Fix, Kate Hoper, and Jie Zong
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

This study looks at the educational and economic outcomes of five refugee communities (Vietnamese, Cuban, Russian, Iraqi and Burmese) in four states (California, Florida, New York and Texas).  The key question is whether the location of refugee resettlement has a significant impact on refugee integration.  This has been described as “the lottery effect” – the idea that refugees’ lives are impacted by being placed in locales with very different labor markets, costs of living and social safety nets.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Cuban Migration: A Postrevolution Exodus Ebbs and Flows

Report Author: 
Jorge Duany
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

This article examines the history of Cuban emigration and the political context within which it has occurred. While there was Cuban migration to the U.S. before the Cuban Revolution of 1959, the scale of that migration increased greatly afterwards. The author divides migration since 1959 into five phases and notes that the socioeconomic characteristics of migrants changes with each new phase. The first wave from 1959 and 1962 consisted largely of the upper and middle classes; later, Cuban migrants increasingly resembled labor migrants coming from other countries.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Sanctuary Networks

Report Author: 
Pratheepan Gulasekaram and Rose Cuison Villazor
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Apr

In light of heightened immigration enforcement, the term ‘sanctuary’ has been increasingly popular in the media and amongst immigration rights advocates. This article defines sanctuary as a range of policies adopted by public and private entities which seek to limit participation in federal immigration enforcement practices to engage in deliberate non-cooperation with immigration policy. The article offers a concise overview of the history of the sanctuary movement and explores how concepts of sanctuary have evolved in the context of hyper-enforcement within immigration policy. 

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Source Organization: 
Other

Immigrant Health-Care Workers in the United States

Report Author: 
Szilvia Altorjai and Jeanne Batalova
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

With health-care reform high on the legislative agenda and the implications of immigration policy changes on particular populations in the news, the role of the foreign born in medical occupations has become a topic of intense interest. Immigrants represent a significant slice of this labor force, comprising almost 17 percent of the 12.4 million people in the United States working as doctors, nurses, dentists, and in other health-care occupations in 2015.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Immigration and Farm Labor: From Unauthorized to H-2A for Some?

Report Author: 
Philip Martin
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Aug

Although immigrant workers have long been employed on U.S. farms, shifting migration patterns and employer labor strategies are reshaping the agricultural workforce. Migration from Mexico to the United States has slowed with the the 2008–09 recession, improving conditions in rural Mexico, and stepped-up border enforcement.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

On the Clock: How Immigrants Fill Gaps in the Labor Market by Working Nontraditional Hours

Report Author: 
Pavel Dramski, PhD
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

A new study from New American Economy shows that of the 30.2 million workers in America working the night shift, weekends, or other unusual working hours, nearly 5.5 million of them are foreign-born. The findings of the report are based on an analysis of the American Community Survey (ACS) and the American Time Use Survey (ATUS).

 

 

Source Organization: 
Other

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in North Carolina: Perspectives from Immigrants and Community-Based Organizations

Report Author: 
Hannah Gill and Sara Peña
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jan

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which provides work authorization and a two-year reprieve for some young, undocumented immigrants, affects both the individual granted the reprieve and the broader economy. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in North Carolina: Perspectives from Immigrants and Community-Based Organizations examines the impact of the program in the state with the highest application rate for the first two years of DACA’s existence.

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Source Organization: 
Other

The Evolving and Diversifying Nature of Migration to the U.S.-Mexican Border

Report Author: 
Jessica Bolter
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Feb

Due to historically low levels of Mexican migration in recent years, unauthorized migrants through the southern border are now more likely to come from Central American countries, such as El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras, as well as from countries in the Caribbean, Asia and Africa. This article argues that policy changes are necessary given the growing diversity of arrivals. The majority of new arrivals, particularly those from Cuba and Haiti, are trying to seek admission through official border crossings rather than trying to evade detection.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

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